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Social Studies


811-813 Civics Level 3-5 0.5 Credit – One Semester
Beginning in fall of 2009 all 11th graders will take this course in conjunction with a required semester of Economics. Civics is the study of citizenship, the Constitution, the political system of the United States, the workings of local, state and national governments, other governments and other topics related to this class.


814-816 Economics Level 3-5 0.5 Credit – One Semester
Beginning in the fall of 2009 all 11th graders will take this course in conjunction with Civics. This class will cover the workings of local, state and national economic systems, capitalism and other economic systems and theories, the concept of supply and demand, personal economics and other related topics.

817-819 Foundations of Modern United States of America
Levels 3-5 1 Credit – Full Year
This course is required for all 9th grade students. In this course students will explore the roots of
America as a modern nation through the study of historical concepts, primary document analysis, in depth discussion and debate, use of video, music, and technology. Topics may include the Rise of Industry, Reform and Protest, Becoming a World Power, Popular Culture, The Cold War, Challenges and Triumphs.


821 World History-Western Civilization Level 5
1 Credit - Full Year
Offered as a full year elective primarily geared to college-bound students, it covers events and civilizations such as ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia, Greece, Rome, the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the Reformation, Imperialism, World War I and the Russian Revolution. Emphasis is placed on note taking skills, lectures, essay questions and long-term assignment schedules. Primary source materials, films, and games are utilized. Evaluation is based on tests, quizzes, homework, projects and class participation. Open to grades 10 - 12.


822 World Geography Western Hemisphere Level 4
0.5 Credit-One Semester
This course will focus on the location and characteristics of the Western Hemisphere, which will include New Hampshire, the United States, Canada and Latin America. Map knowledge and usage, as well as basic geographic terms and skills, will be the focus of this course. Students will be evaluated through tests, quizzes, homework and projects. Open to grades 10 - 12.


823 World Geography Eastern Hemisphere Level 4
0.5 Credit-One Semester
This course will focus on the character, human interaction and comparisons of the Eastern Hemisphere, which will include countries of Europe and Asia. Map knowledge and usage, as well as basic geographic terms and skills, will be the focus of this course. Students will be evaluated through tests, quizzes, homework and projects. Open to grades 10 - 12. *Juniors in the class of 2010 are required to take one of the following United States History courses:


832-833 U. S. History Level 3-4 1 Credit - Full Year
This course is required for all juniors. Students taking this course will deal with historical concepts and facts dating from the Age of Exploration to the present. Colonial Settlement and Development, the American Revolution, the Federal Era, the Age of Jackson, Westward Expansion, Civil War and Reconstruction, the Industrial Age, the Progressive Era, WWI, the Roaring Twenties, the Great Depression and the New Deal, WWII and our Post War Emergence as a leader of the Free World are possible topics covered by this course. New Hampshire's role as related to the above historical periods will be included. Evaluation will be based on tests, quizzes, homework and class participation. Open to grades 11 - 12.


835 U.S. History Level 5 1 Credit - Full Year
This is an accelerated course which will survey the history of the United States beginning with the Age of Colonization and concluding with World War II, as time allows. We will utilize a variety of skills in our approach: gathering and interpreting evidence, analyzing concepts, and generalizing and synthesizing in frequent written exercises. A major research paper will also be required toward the end of the course Evaluation will be based on tests, quizzes, homework and class participation. Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation. Open to grades 11 - 12.


834 U.S. History Level 6 2 Credit - Two Years
This is an accelerated study of American History. It is a writing intensive course. The use of primary source and other documents in developing and defending theses is a mainstay of the instruction. Students who successfully complete this course may be advised to take the Advanced Placement test. A successful score on that test allows the student to earn college credit. The course is spread over two years and covers US History from the Age of Exploration to the Present. The 1st year of the course is designated as “Honors” and is considered a building process in the skills in the even more advanced demands of the Advanced Placement / second year. Students opting for this course would probably forego the freshman course in US History. Anyone interested in taking this course is advised to consult with the guidance and history department before making the decision. Successful completion of the 1st year of this course would fulfill the NHS American History requirement. Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation. Open to grades 11 - 12.


841 Introduction to Psychology Level 4-5 0.5 Credit - One Semester
Psychology is the study of human behavior. The course is a general survey of several areas in psychology: physiology, learning, motivation, personality, behavioral disorders, and social psychology. The course is designed for those who wish to obtain a general introduction to the field. The course is open only to seniors.


842 Street Law Level 4 0.5 Credit - One Semester
The objective of the course is to promote an awareness of the American Legal System and the fundamental principles and values expressed in The United States Constitution. An emphasis will be placed on social issues that are law related, the meaning of Justice, and the importance of fairness in our society. This will be accomplished through class discussions, role-plays, mock trials, case studies, guest speakers, and a field trip during the semester. Prerequisite: Students must have passed Civics. Open to grades 10 - 12.


843 Modern U.S. History Level 5 0.5 Credit - One Semester
The students taking this course will deal with concepts and facts involving the United States since the end of World War II. Major emphasis will be placed on the following events: a) the Cold War and its impacts (social/economic/military); b) Korea and Vietnam Conflict; c) the McCarthy Era and Communism; d) Civil Rights and the Great Society; e) Watergate and the Oil Crisis; f) Terrorism and U.S. Foreign Policy; g) the Reagan Revolution and the 1980's; h) economic political and social changes in the 1990's; i) expectations in the 21st Century. Guest speakers, group and individual projects, field trips and debates will be scheduled throughout the year. Evaluation will be based on class participation, exams and projects. This course is designed primarily for the collegebound student. This elective course does not count towards fulfillment of the U.S. History graduation requirement. Open to grades 10 - 12.

844-846 Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness in the United States
Level 3-5 0.5 credit - One Semester
Our country was founded on the belief in certain inalienable rights – freedom, fairness, and opportunity for all. But did our country’s framers imagine shopping malls, the Internet, and females in the military and high-ranking government positions? Did they envision a fourth branch of government – the media? Through reading, discussions and projects, we will explore the different issues affecting American life, such as family, education work, and science and technology. This course can count towards graduation as either an English or social studies credit. Open to grades 10 - 12.


847-848 Sociology Levels 4-5 0.5 credit-One Semester
This is an introductory course in Sociology. Sociology is the study of human groups while psychology focuses primarily on the behavior of individuals. Topics included in this course include crime, deviance, gangs and other group types. Ethnic, racial, and gender issues, cultural development, teen issues and the institutions of family, religion and sports are among topics to be addressed. This course is open to seniors only.


849-850 Comparative Religions
Levels 4-5 0.5 credit-One Semester
This is an introduction to the major world religions including: Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism, Shinto, Judaism, Christianity and Islam. Through a study of the fundamental religious beliefs students will gain understanding of their key elements, similarities and differences to help gain a better understanding of today’s modern world. This course is open to grades 11-12.

851-852 US in World Affairs Levels 4-5
0.5 credit-One Semester
This course serves as an introduction to international relations. Some topics will include: our responsibilities as global citizens exposing students to leading ideas in international relations theory, defense policy, the causes of war, foreign policy, international political economy, globalization, human rights and environmental degradation. In addition to the topics being explored, emphasis will be placed on the developing critical thinking and writing. This course is open to grades 11-12.